Conversation Limited

A lively group discussion, an intimate tête-à-tête, an inner monologue — in your view, when it comes to a good conversation, what’s the ideal number of people?


As a guy born with Asperger’s, having any conversation takes a little bit of a push and some needed inspiration; I’m just so used to living in a confined shell that breaking out of that comfort zone can be stressful. The best conversation I can handle is one to two people at most and then after that it starts getting muddled and confusing. The biggest discussion I had with more than two people was fairly watered down and uneventful and I felt rather uncomfortable sharing some thoughts of mine. On the other hand, one on one discussions follow one train of thought, not multiple train tracks coming from multiple directions and they go further for me because of the continuing build of rapport and trust. One on one conversations are more serious and thoughtful than multiple person talks. Ideas get across more coherently instead of being lost in translation.

It was not until about the eleventh grade that conversation became more easier for me and I was not so intimidated by it – though I still am afraid to even talk on Skype, Hangouts, or any other video chat. I met a good, albeit crazy, friend named Josh and we seemed to hit it off from day one and never looked back. He began the spark that took me away from the notion that conversation was pointless and futile and made me realize that having friends was the key to living a well-balanced life. Josh was so full of energy and excitement; me, a mellow, calm, cool, and collected person but he managed to pull me out of that persona – for at least one year.

My uncle Jack is the one I am extremely comfortable having unrestricted conversations with. Our subjects are usually on football, food, or other people in general that we disagree with. The thing is, I sometimes leave him hanging and don’t add anything new unless asked, occupying myself with stuff I’m more interested in such as my computer, but that has been a thing I’ve been forcing myself to change.

I wouldn’t call myself the catalyst to any conversation…I’m more of the jump on board the train when it starts going at a fine pace kind of guy.

When trapped in my head

No limits to converse

Thoughts and I one on one


 Daily Prompt 10/11/14

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Author: Macbofisbil

Welcome to "Macbofisbil: An Awesome Mind", a place where you will find all sorts of interesting stories, pictures, and advice on life in general.

2 thoughts on “Conversation Limited”

  1. As far as I can judge, my autistic son is not frightened of a conversation. When he was growing up words were sparse, especially with abstract words, but today at the age of 45 he manages. The problem is that either he is a minimalist with his words, or if the subject suits (usually pop music where he is a walking lexikon) he can hold a conversation for a long while, although the conversation can be a little one sided eventually. However, no problem, if I say ok, he stops. He is just my autistic son and I have no problem.

    1. I appreciate your constructive input on this. This is a touchy subject for me that I rarely speak or write about. I agree with the fact that autistic people tend to gravitate towards one area of interest and converse if something suits them. But I do disagree when people say people with autism can’t be cured, or are helpless, or they toss the r word around. That’s really great of you to accept your son like that, no matter his faults.

All thoughts are welcome

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